pablogotobed:

Peej & Huntress selfie! 

pablogotobed:

Peej & Huntress selfie! 

48 plays

The 1990s was a rubbish decade for comics, but an excellent one for music. One of my favourite bands from Northern England during this era was Dubstar, which produced this lovely hit from their debut album, Disgraceful. This song was also later covered by Italian band Lacuna Coil. (Their cover is lovely too by the way)!

I have a lot of writing to do this weekend, mostly Helena Wayne-related, but in the meantime, let me treat you to my colourful taste in music. :)

Stand by.

Why do you like Helena Wayne?
Anonymous

notimpossiblejustabitunlikely:

helenawaynehuntress:

blackbatpurplecat:

Oh, that’s an unexpected question!
Please check out this amazing blog if you want to know everything about Helena Wayne.

This won’t be such a long post like my last rambling. I’m gonna try to sum things up.
1. She’s a DC character who is an awesome, ass kicking female and her costume covers her entire body. We need more ladies like her! Independent, intelligent, skillfully.
2. She used to be a lawyer who didn’t take shit from anyone. She’s nobody’s damsel. She’s strong and confident but accepts her weaker moments as well, just as a fully developed person would.
3. She might be gay and I love that development! I really hope they’re gonna go through with this idea (but only if they handle it the mature way they’re handling Batwoman in).
4. She has very powerful parents but is badass enough to step out of their shadows and leave her own mark.
5. She’s the daughter of my OTP with her mom’s looks and wits, and her dad’s eyes and sense of duty. Let’s face it, we all carry a torch for our OTP’s canon children. ;)

6. She has Power Girl as both her best friend and partner, which adds more to her appeal, at least in my case. :) 

7. When I was a kid during Helena Wayne’s first incarnation, she spoke to me in a way no other female comic hero did. The fact that she didn’t have powers was part of it, but so was the fact that she was a grown woman. Batgirl was closer to Robin, but the Huntress was every bit a female Batman.

Why do you like Helena Wayne?
Anonymous

blackbatpurplecat:

Oh, that’s an unexpected question!
Please check out this amazing blog if you want to know everything about Helena Wayne.

This won’t be such a long post like my last rambling. I’m gonna try to sum things up.
1. She’s a DC character who is an awesome, ass kicking female and her costume covers her entire body. We need more ladies like her! Independent, intelligent, skillfully.
2. She used to be a lawyer who didn’t take shit from anyone. She’s nobody’s damsel. She’s strong and confident but accepts her weaker moments as well, just as a fully developed person would.
3. She might be gay and I love that development! I really hope they’re gonna go through with this idea (but only if they handle it the mature way they’re handling Batwoman in).
4. She has very powerful parents but is badass enough to step out of their shadows and leave her own mark.
5. She’s the daughter of my OTP with her mom’s looks and wits, and her dad’s eyes and sense of duty. Let’s face it, we all carry a torch for our OTP’s canon children. ;)

6. She has Power Girl as both her best friend and partner, which adds more to her appeal, at least in my case. :) 

Batman/Superman  #9 Preview
So. Two things about this preview:
1. First time we see the words HELENA WAYNE printed on the page.2. Superman acknowledges that Power Girl is Kara Zor-L aka Supergirl.
Dr. Anj will be very pleased to see this. :)

Batman/Superman  #9 Preview

So. Two things about this preview:

1. First time we see the words HELENA WAYNE printed on the page.
2. Superman acknowledges that Power Girl is Kara Zor-L aka Supergirl.

Dr. Anj will be very pleased to see this. :)

This is seriously turning out to be a roller-coaster of a week and not in a good way. Earlier this week, an avalanche of vile misogyny came crashing down on comic book professional Janelle Asselin for criticising the comic book industry on their failure to market books to a wider audience. It is a legitimate criticism when you consider that the goal of comic book publishers—like any other business—is to make money. She was especially on spot with the role that covers (and even teaser images) play in marketing:

Covers are important, but their job is also very basic. A good comics cover alludes to the story within, yes, but most importantly, it draws readers in. In comics, covers have an especially important role in marketing, a role that hits three or four times. A cover is often the project’s first impression, debuting online either in solicitations or other promotional campaigns.

I agree. And consistent with this discussion, my first impression of the teaser for Earth-2: World’s End is anything but good, especially since the teaser features the image of a young woman who appears to be dead in the arms of her grandfather. The seemingly dead woman in the teaser is none other than Helena Wayne (the Huntress) in the arms of Thomas Wayne, the new Earth-2 Batman. You can already imagine where I’m going to go with this.

Read more.

Exclusive: DC Comics Unevils EARTH 2: WORLD’S END Weekly Series
Judging by the cover, the women are once again disempowered to service the men in the narrative. Not only is Power Girl seen being comforted by the new Earth-2 Superman, but I see Helena Wayne’s final fate will once again be to ‘die in a Crisis.’ Just like last time, only this time her death appears to affect her grandfather, Thomas Wayne.
I am not going to run out of things to talk about this week, am I? 

Exclusive: DC Comics Unevils EARTH 2: WORLD’S END Weekly Series

Judging by the cover, the women are once again disempowered to service the men in the narrative. Not only is Power Girl seen being comforted by the new Earth-2 Superman, but I see Helena Wayne’s final fate will once again be to ‘die in a Crisis.’ Just like last time, only this time her death appears to affect her grandfather, Thomas Wayne.

I am not going to run out of things to talk about this week, am I? 

confusiongrows:

Right on.

So, here we go again: the problem of sexual harassment in the comic book industry.  Which totally feels like deja vuI wrote about this back in November, as did a lot of creators, but to what point?  Did anyone learn from the discussion?

Apparently not.  Because the shit has hit the fan again, and as always it’s the ladies who are paying the price for having the gall to say what’s on our minds.  This time around it’s Janelle Asselin, who wrote a piece called “Let’s Talk About How Some Men Talk To Women In Comics”.  It’s part of a larger discussion she began about art, marketing, gender, all very non-threatening– and yet, she was threatened with rape.  Just for talking about a comic book cover.

That’s fucked up.  You all realize that, right?  But it happens, regularly, even if the ladies who are subject to this abuse don’t always bring it up.   And if it’s not rape threats, it’s other kinds of verbal abuse or sexual harassment.  Men are frequently surprised when they hear this happens.

This is an excellent article from one of my favourite writers, Marjorie Liu, that’s very spot on about why misogyny as a real societal problem needs to be addressed, discussed, and actively changed.

She says everything I’ve been wanting to say about this latest shitstorm, but addresses her points assertively and much more eloquently than I would have had. I can safely tell you, my thoughts would have been more strongly worded and full of anger. 

What transpired over the past few days was completely unprofessional and unacceptable behaviour from an industry professional who should’ve known better than to be snowball that started the avalanche of vile misogynistic abuse of a woman who spoke up about a very real problem that exists not just in the comics industry, but in the world at large. A world that has and continues to treat women as objects that exist for men’s use, something other than human. That is unacceptable.

I will write my own thoughts on this over the weekend when I actually have the time to sit down and write. But do read Marjorie’s article as it is VERY spot on about a very real problem that affects women of all ages and of various walks of life.