Helena Wayne

Jul 28

THE HUNTRESS | Original artwork by Steve Epting circa 2013.  

THE HUNTRESS | Original artwork by Steve Epting circa 2013.  

Jul 27

(Source: axeeeee, via georgethecat)

Jul 26

If you are attending SDCC, ask this question for me at a DC panel

When are we going to start seeing a DC Universe that:

  1. Is actually comprised of world building as opposed to finding new ways to destroy and kill off our favourite characters for shock value.

  2. Where characters are allowed to properly grow and develop as individuals as opposed to keeping them in a perpetual stasis.

  3. Where superheroes are allowed to form close relationships with others, including romantic ones without killing them off—again—for shock value.

  4. Where women will actually be treated with respect and not treated as props that exist for male narratives.

  5. Where women, people of colour, queer characters, and other diverse characters are actually characterised like complex human beings with legitimate goals in life, and not reduced into stereotypes?

Most importantly, what is your problem with women that you continue to repeat the same problems you are frequently called out on, such as the much-hated women in refrigerators trope and sexualisation of their bodies?

And DO give us a better answer than ‘well, the point of the story is…,’ or ‘we do it to men too…’ Save it. We’ve already heard those tunes before. Sing us a new one.

theimancameron:

helenawaynehuntress:

SAN DIEGO COMIC CON | Discussion on the Earth-2: World's End Weekly.

Heading into the real world’s future, Bennett and Wilson discussed “Earth 2: World’s End,” and the challenge of doing a high-profile weekly series.
"This is my first panel at Comic-Con with comic book people," said Wilson. "It’s great to be a part of that, now! … For me, this was like getting thrown into the deep end of the pool. We’re in a situation where we’re continuing what’s going on in ‘Earth 2’ and there are some catastrophic events on the way and we’re bridging into the future. On the ground level, we have characters like Dick Grayson who are surviving on the ground, then you bump up a bit and you have the World Army — then, to the top level. Having all of this play out at the same time is really interesting; figuring out who deals with what and what’s happening to the world.”
Bennett said the series is the story about a world getting destroyed, and she was inspired by the work the “Eternal” team was doing. “It’s not just a story of attrition or the death of the world, it’s a story about the people in that world,” she said. “It’s a story of triumph, of love and hope that’s coming out of the ruins.”
Wilson has destroyed worlds before in novels, and he said what emerges out of it are the relationships between the people. “They’re not fighting to preserve even their cities or the planet itself. It all boils down to these relationships,” he said. “It has to ultimately be about the emotions or you don’t have anything to move the characters across the board and get good stories out of.”
The first issue of “World’s End” will have an intro to what’s been going on in “Earth 2,” and Wilson said it was challenging to try and explain it all. “It involved going in clinically — because we’re doing world-building here — and required a lot of research to get it all out there on the page,” he said.
"It was important to us to make it immediate and accessible as possible," said Bennett. "Tom Taylor laid such a great groundwork with the ‘Earth 2’ monthly, and we wanted moments of levity and moments of joy to be very present."
Wilson said one of the things he always wanted to know from “Earth 2” was “What happened to Sam?” and noted that readers might get a chance to get a little bit of closure in that area.

So Earth-2 Dick does exist after all?
(Source)

This image bothers me…A LOT!! And STILL no Wildcat!! 

Oh hun. I stopped expecting the Earth-2 Justice Society when James Robinson was still on the book. :/

theimancameron:

helenawaynehuntress:

SAN DIEGO COMIC CON | Discussion on the Earth-2: World's End Weekly.

Heading into the real world’s future, Bennett and Wilson discussed “Earth 2: World’s End,” and the challenge of doing a high-profile weekly series.

"This is my first panel at Comic-Con with comic book people," said Wilson. "It’s great to be a part of that, now! … For me, this was like getting thrown into the deep end of the pool. We’re in a situation where we’re continuing what’s going on in ‘Earth 2’ and there are some catastrophic events on the way and we’re bridging into the future. On the ground level, we have characters like Dick Grayson who are surviving on the ground, then you bump up a bit and you have the World Army — then, to the top level. Having all of this play out at the same time is really interesting; figuring out who deals with what and what’s happening to the world.”

Bennett said the series is the story about a world getting destroyed, and she was inspired by the work the “Eternal” team was doing. “It’s not just a story of attrition or the death of the world, it’s a story about the people in that world,” she said. “It’s a story of triumph, of love and hope that’s coming out of the ruins.”

Wilson has destroyed worlds before in novels, and he said what emerges out of it are the relationships between the people. “They’re not fighting to preserve even their cities or the planet itself. It all boils down to these relationships,” he said. “It has to ultimately be about the emotions or you don’t have anything to move the characters across the board and get good stories out of.”

The first issue of “World’s End” will have an intro to what’s been going on in “Earth 2,” and Wilson said it was challenging to try and explain it all. “It involved going in clinically — because we’re doing world-building here — and required a lot of research to get it all out there on the page,” he said.

"It was important to us to make it immediate and accessible as possible," said Bennett. "Tom Taylor laid such a great groundwork with the ‘Earth 2’ monthly, and we wanted moments of levity and moments of joy to be very present."

Wilson said one of the things he always wanted to know from “Earth 2” was “What happened to Sam?” and noted that readers might get a chance to get a little bit of closure in that area.

So Earth-2 Dick does exist after all?

(Source)

This image bothers me…A LOT!! And STILL no Wildcat!! 

Oh hun. I stopped expecting the Earth-2 Justice Society when James Robinson was still on the book. :/

SAN DIEGO COMIC CON | Discussion on the Earth-2: World's End Weekly.

Heading into the real world’s future, Bennett and Wilson discussed “Earth 2: World’s End,” and the challenge of doing a high-profile weekly series.
"This is my first panel at Comic-Con with comic book people," said Wilson. "It’s great to be a part of that, now! … For me, this was like getting thrown into the deep end of the pool. We’re in a situation where we’re continuing what’s going on in ‘Earth 2’ and there are some catastrophic events on the way and we’re bridging into the future. On the ground level, we have characters like Dick Grayson who are surviving on the ground, then you bump up a bit and you have the World Army — then, to the top level. Having all of this play out at the same time is really interesting; figuring out who deals with what and what’s happening to the world.”
Bennett said the series is the story about a world getting destroyed, and she was inspired by the work the “Eternal” team was doing. “It’s not just a story of attrition or the death of the world, it’s a story about the people in that world,” she said. “It’s a story of triumph, of love and hope that’s coming out of the ruins.”
Wilson has destroyed worlds before in novels, and he said what emerges out of it are the relationships between the people. “They’re not fighting to preserve even their cities or the planet itself. It all boils down to these relationships,” he said. “It has to ultimately be about the emotions or you don’t have anything to move the characters across the board and get good stories out of.”
The first issue of “World’s End” will have an intro to what’s been going on in “Earth 2,” and Wilson said it was challenging to try and explain it all. “It involved going in clinically — because we’re doing world-building here — and required a lot of research to get it all out there on the page,” he said.
"It was important to us to make it immediate and accessible as possible," said Bennett. "Tom Taylor laid such a great groundwork with the ‘Earth 2’ monthly, and we wanted moments of levity and moments of joy to be very present."
Wilson said one of the things he always wanted to know from “Earth 2” was “What happened to Sam?” and noted that readers might get a chance to get a little bit of closure in that area.

So Earth-2 Dick does exist after all?
(Source)

SAN DIEGO COMIC CON | Discussion on the Earth-2: World's End Weekly.

Heading into the real world’s future, Bennett and Wilson discussed “Earth 2: World’s End,” and the challenge of doing a high-profile weekly series.

"This is my first panel at Comic-Con with comic book people," said Wilson. "It’s great to be a part of that, now! … For me, this was like getting thrown into the deep end of the pool. We’re in a situation where we’re continuing what’s going on in ‘Earth 2’ and there are some catastrophic events on the way and we’re bridging into the future. On the ground level, we have characters like Dick Grayson who are surviving on the ground, then you bump up a bit and you have the World Army — then, to the top level. Having all of this play out at the same time is really interesting; figuring out who deals with what and what’s happening to the world.”

Bennett said the series is the story about a world getting destroyed, and she was inspired by the work the “Eternal” team was doing. “It’s not just a story of attrition or the death of the world, it’s a story about the people in that world,” she said. “It’s a story of triumph, of love and hope that’s coming out of the ruins.”

Wilson has destroyed worlds before in novels, and he said what emerges out of it are the relationships between the people. “They’re not fighting to preserve even their cities or the planet itself. It all boils down to these relationships,” he said. “It has to ultimately be about the emotions or you don’t have anything to move the characters across the board and get good stories out of.”

The first issue of “World’s End” will have an intro to what’s been going on in “Earth 2,” and Wilson said it was challenging to try and explain it all. “It involved going in clinically — because we’re doing world-building here — and required a lot of research to get it all out there on the page,” he said.

"It was important to us to make it immediate and accessible as possible," said Bennett. "Tom Taylor laid such a great groundwork with the ‘Earth 2’ monthly, and we wanted moments of levity and moments of joy to be very present."

Wilson said one of the things he always wanted to know from “Earth 2” was “What happened to Sam?” and noted that readers might get a chance to get a little bit of closure in that area.

So Earth-2 Dick does exist after all?

(Source)

Anonymous said: okay, so i haven't read/watched too much with Huntress in it, but i was just wondering how you felt about Huntress being with Question??

I felt that Helena Bertinelli and Vic Sage complemented each other really well and had great chemistry together. I was saddened to not see more of it in the mainstream comics.

Hopefully they’ll reunite in the New 52!

GAL GADOT | This has me pumped for a Wonder Woman solo film.

GAL GADOT | This has me pumped for a Wonder Woman solo film.

intenselittledevil:

OH
MY
FUCKING
GOD

Someone call me when this movie is actually called Wonder Woman and Batman and Superman don’t share her narrative or screen time.

intenselittledevil:

OH

MY

FUCKING

GOD

Someone call me when this movie is actually called Wonder Woman and Batman and Superman don’t share her narrative or screen time.

(via confusiongrows)

Anonymous said: Do you think that Talia has ever been serious competition for Selina as Bruce's iconic love interest?

Not that I’m aware of, no. There’s been rivalry between the two in narratives, but never an outright competition for Bruce’s affections.

(And frankly, I preferred if it stayed that way. We don’t need more opportunities to reinforce sexist stereotypes in media, and DC doesn’t need to keep digging themselves into their increasingly deep grave).

Anonymous said: Do you think the Autobiography of Bruce Wayne is better than The Dark Knight Returns? If so, why?

Oh waaaaaay better….TONNES better than any of Frank Miller’s stuff.

Frank Miller’s interpretation of Batman is that someone who doesn’t even think of himself as human and distances himself from his humanity. For all the praise Miller gets for his work on Batman, I personally think this is a wrong interpretation of him given how very human his motivations for being Batman are. I am also never fond of any version of Batman who is presented as a broken, ultra-violent wealthy man who exerts his power over other people outside the law, and devalues his relationships with even the most important people in his life.

Considering the iconicity of Batman in mainstream American culture, and how many boys look up to him, presenting him in such a manner sends the wrong and even dangerous message. It is the kind of narrative that also influences negative attitudes about gender and relationships, which consequently also influence the same kinds of gross misogynistic storytelling that we frequently see in many modern narratives. 

The reason I think the Autobiography of Bruce Wayne is a better Batman story is one I’ve already discussed in my review of it. But the short version is it’s a story that explores Bruce Wayne embracing his humanity. What made this story particularly interesting is that it was an examination of the original Golden Age Batman, which is also the version of Batman who started his career killing criminals. To see how he evolved from that earlier period of his life is what makes this a pretty powerful piece.

After functioning as Batman for 15 years, Bruce started thinking about where his life was going, where the people who matter to him were in their lives, and where he would find himself once he was finally alone and Dick Grayson had moved on with his life. He also thought about whether or not he really wanted to be Batman for the rest of his life, or if there was a different place he could be in his own life. More importantly, he realised that he had spent spent a good chunk of his life avenging the family that he lost, but hasn’t thought about the kind of family he could have if only he’d let other people into his life.

Those are all themes the Autobiography of Bruce Wayne explores, concluding that in addition to finding the woman he wanted to spend the rest of his life with, he especially found Bruce Wayne again. He learnt to stop finding meaning in death, and instead learnt to find meaning in life. It is the most human Batman story ever told and it’s presented in a way that doesn’t question Bruce’s masculinity for doing so. That to me is a more important and positive message to send out to readers, especially young impressionable readers.